Celtic Cross

by admin on February 23, 2007

Celtic Cross

Celtic Cross

A Tutorial for Celtic Cross Stitch

You can use either Aida cloth or line for Celtic cross stitch, but Aida is the preferred fabric because the holes are already in the fabric for you. It is also bets for beginners and for those who may have poor eyesight. It is available in 8, 11, 14, 16 and 18 blocks per 2.5 cm. The fabric count will tell you how many blocks there are in a standard square of Aida cloth. This fabric also comes in many different colors and you can also dye it to your preferred color. Linen has very few holes counts, which is why it is a difficult fabric for beginners to use. However, there are irregularities in linen, which gives the finished product a more unique look.

 

The basic stitches you need to learn for this cross stitch design are:

 

* X. The X stitch is the basic stitch in any cross stitch pattern. To make this stitch you first have to make a small knot in the end of the thread. Bring the needle up through one of the holes from the wrong side of the fabric so that you now have the needle on the right side. Insert the needle in the hole in the diagonal corner of the square and then bring it back up through the opposite hole. When you once again pass the needle through the corresponding diagonal hole, you have an X pattern over the square.

 

* /. This is the half-sticth pattern and represents one half of the basic X stitch. You simply bring the needle up through a hole and then pass it down through the hole in the diagonal corner.

 

* The Quarter stitch pattern is one half of the half stitch. When you bring your needle up through the hole, put it down through the fabric halfway between the hole and the one in the diagonal corner.

 

* A three-quarter stitch is a combination of both the half and quarter stitch designs. First you make a half stitch and then you proceed as if you were going to make a full X. Instead of making the second half of the stitch you put the needle through the middle of the half stitch.

 

Once you know how to make these stitches, you can create your own Celtic designs that you can use for cross stitch. You do need to have graph paper for such a project. Using a felt tip open make prominent dots in the corners of the squares on the graph paper. Highlight every second dot with a pen. Once you trace out your design in this way for the length of the sheet of paper, then you can start doing the same thing horizontally.

 

Use one section of the graph paper where you have five regular dots and four highlighted dots. Make sure you measure so that your square is even. Each highlighted dot will be the place where the threads intersect, so you can place a small X over these dots. Continue marking these dots with an X all the way to the border but do not mark those that lie on the line of the border. When you have all the highlighted dots crisscrossed, you can join the knot lines along the sides. You will see how they bow out towards each other. Make a double line to connect them to make your circle.

About the Author

For lots of information on Celtic Cross stitch,the significance of the Celtic Cross and where to find Celtic Crosses visit http://www.MyCelticCrossStitch.com

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